Tag Archives: java

Better Test Code Principles #5: Mind your try/catches

Using try/catches to handle exceptions has become quite fashionable when writing tests with Java. However, this approach is also a frequent source of having false positives while running tests. Many times when writing the tests people forget to consider both sections of this code block: they forget to write the appropriate code in both sections – the code that deals with not encountering the exception (if the code in try executes) and the code that deals with encountering the exception (if the code in catch executes).

Continue reading Better Test Code Principles #5: Mind your try/catches

Using Lists to get UI elements with nearly impossible selectors

Where does this approach apply? One of the following:

  • if you have a list of elements with identical selectors. The element you are interested in is an element of that list. But it does not always appear in the same place in the list. Sometimes it might be the third element in the list, other times it might be the second, or the fourth, and so on. You only know that using getText() on the element returns a known text.
  • if the element you are searching for has a different selector each time you open the page. You know only the type of element it is (whether it is a button, or an a element representing a link, or an img element) and what text should be displayed on that element.
  • if the element you are looking for does not even have any attached attributes. That means it is only a tag, without an id or class, or anything else except for the tag name (tag being ‘a’ for links, ‘img’ for images, and so on). You know what getText() should return when applied to that element.

Continue reading Using Lists to get UI elements with nearly impossible selectors

@FindBy, Lists and using them to check for similar UI elements

This is going to be a rather complex post, that will show how to easily check for values of similar UI elements. By similar i mean elements that share some kind of properties: whether they have the same CSS selector, or are part of the same group of elements. Some examples will be shown below. Performing the testing part will imply the use of @FindBy (of Selenium WebDriver) and List (of Java). Read on to get an idea of where this approach can be used, how @FindBy is ideal for such a task, what the basics of working with List are, and what an actual test looks like. Continue reading @FindBy, Lists and using them to check for similar UI elements

Better Test Code Principles: #1 Don’t copy/paste the code. Reuse it.

When starting to learn Java, one of the first things you are taught is that a class consists of several things, among which are the ‘methods’.  A method is nothing more than grouping of several code lines. Since tests are code, the same principle applies to writing your Java based tests. Especially if you are dealing with duplicate code (code you keep copy/pasting all across your test project).

So what would be the reasons for not wanting to duplicate your code, but instead grouping it into methods: Continue reading Better Test Code Principles: #1 Don’t copy/paste the code. Reuse it.

Selenium tests, the Object Oriented way – example 1 (with code)

This is going to be a follow-up post in regards to the approach i showed at my SeleniumConf talk, on doing Selenium tests by using an Object Oriented approach.

I will have a series of such posts, to show more examples and to make it easier to understand how to use it. All the code presented here will be available in GitHub under this location: https://github.com/iamalittletester/learning-project. Continue reading Selenium tests, the Object Oriented way – example 1 (with code)

Working with lists: ImmutableList

When you are faced with a task that involves using lists, you might want to consider the following question: are the elements in my list ever going to change, or is it enough to just add my elements to the list once and use them across my tests. Is my list a constant? In case your elements will not change, you can use an ImmutableList to store them, which brings a major advantage: defining a list in one line. ImmutableList is part of the ‘guava’ library. Continue reading Working with lists: ImmutableList

Selenium tests, the Object Oriented Way

Some while ago i published an article in a local magazine on the topic of writing Selenium tests in an Object Oriented fashion.  As i believe this is a very useful way of reducing the number of asserts tests can include, and to expand to a bigger audience, here is a different approach to writing Selenium tests.

This approach is recommended when you have, for example, a big module whose properties you must compare to the expected ones, after performing an action or when it comes to testing the translation of the page. Continue reading Selenium tests, the Object Oriented Way